Go Back   The Scream! > COMMUNITY FORUMS > General Chatty Stuff

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-January-2014, 15:51
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

How do you deal with or handle the "pushy salesman"?

Car salesmen? Insurance salesmen? Doorstep seller?

Do you fold under the pressure? Do you question them to get a true response to your questions? Perhaps you just walk away and shop somewhere else?

Tell us how do you handle this type of situation.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-January-2014, 17:00
gem's Avatar
gem gem is offline
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Currently in Brittany, France
Posts: 5,606
Cool Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Well, seeing as you would normally only deal with a salesperson when you intend to purchase something, my advice is that you ALWAYS ensure that you have the done some research beforehand - NEVER go in blind. If they get pushy ask to see the Manager or simply walk away.

Whatever you do, DON'T be rude etc.
__________________
GEM
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-January-2014, 20:12
Worldlife's Avatar
Worldlife Worldlife is offline
Safe Sane Consensual
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: West Sussex, UK
Posts: 14,843
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Agree with Gem you must do a bit of research and perhaps look into "Which?" reports or findings from other customers in Amazon or similar reviews.

The worst example I have is of a salesperson for a major computer outlet urging me to purchase an expensive guarantee extension on a Samsung monitor.

He tried to undermine my opinion that monitors were a reliable product and seldom went wrong!

He then pushed the accidental damage protection and I suggested that my home insurance policy would cover that in any case.

I should have made a complaint to the firm concerned because when I unpacked the monitor Samsung too shared my confidence in their product. Their warrantee protection was for three years.

It must be stressed that under the Sales of Goods Act the retailer and not the manufacturer is responsible for faulty goods and that obligation is not limited to the normally quoted period one year.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-January-2014, 21:29
druid's Avatar
druid druid is offline
Scrimper
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: England
Posts: 820
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Anyone that comes to my gate to sell (they don't get to my door, I lock my gate and have a bell on the gatepost) I just ask them what they want and then say I am not interested thank you.

Having been in the retail service trade most of my life I am not intimidated by salesmen and know how to deal with them.

If I am buying something I always do research beforehand and always know in advance what I want and a salesman would find it 100% impossible to change my mind.

I always give an appearance that I am not really bothered about buying the object and even when I show interest always plead poverty and suggest that I would be more interested if it was cheaper, if they don't take the hint I then say that I would be more interested to purchase if they offered a discount! A good salesperson would always offer something rather than lose a customer and if they wouldn't move on price I would suggest a litte extra free item be thrown in.

In the end they often give me a decent deal to get shot of me!
__________________
John
Chief Scrimper, Woodworker, cyclist & Motorbiker
If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something
A part dropped from the workbench will roll to a degree of un-reachability proportional to its importance.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-January-2014, 21:40
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

I disagree. Part of researching something could be going to see it "in the flesh".

I would normally walk away and never deal with such a company but I have been pushed to get somewhat stronger. In that case, I will most likely lay it on the line and inform them that I really do not want to deal with a company that encourages pushy sales and to keep it up, if they wanted to see the back of me.

I have had one door to door salesman that I called the police on. The guy was downright rude and offensive when asked to leave. Other door to door sales I have called the company to complain about either frequency of visits or the behaviour of their staff. That does seem to have worked.

These are exceptions though. Mostly, I either walk away or in the case of any door to door sales (or callers) either tell them I am not interested or that I never buy anything on the doorstep.

As an aside, I am terrible for researching in advance. I do it to far too high a degree! LOL
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-January-2014, 00:20
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How d o you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

It must be stressed that under the Sales of Goods Act the retailer and not the manufacturer is responsible for faulty goods and that obligation is not limited to the normally quoted period one year.
Originally Posted by Worldlife View Post

Do you know much about this subject please Worldlife?? I bought quite an expensive Thomas Sabo (German company) bracelet from the Internet (store on Internet, not private sale) in March 2013, for my granddaughter's 21st birthday gift. Apparently it has broken, as the catch in the middle has come un-threaded, so she can't wear it.

I contacted the store but they say because of the time passed they can't replace it and Thomas Sabo won't accept it back from them for repair.

I thought most things came with a statutory 1 year guarantee under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and should be of merchantable quality, fit for the purpose it was made. To me, breaking after 9 months isn't reasonable quality or fit for purpose, nor is it out of the 1 year guarantee.

Do you know if they can refuse to exchange or repair it?? I have been looking through the sale of goods act but it didn't really help at all. Any advice would be gratefully accepted.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-January-2014, 00:22
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

lol, wish I could be more like you druid!! I do manage to get good deals but I'm not that savvy!! lol
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-January-2014, 01:13
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

The warranty period shall be two years after the goods are delivered.
Source.

You simply tell your supplier that your contract is with them (as an Official Partner/Outlet/Agent of TS) and not Thomas Sabo. Further inform them that TS guarantee their products for two years and you expect them to honour that warranty.

OK, that's the theory! LOL They may bend at that. You may have to get a little heavier or work around the obstacles they place. A threat with Trading Standards is a good start. TS may be able to assist you in gaining success with the vendor. The vendor could try and claim that excessive force was used and therefore that is not guaranteed. Do not give up yet! If the vendor refuses to help you, you can try to get TS to honor the guarantee. Could be an ouchie on the postage and they could still turn round and say the damage was caused by heavy handling. Did you pay by credit card? Your credit card company may offer you some help once you have tried other methods.

Think of the middle lines too. Use one agent against another. Use TS against the vendor. Try to get the guarantee honoured at another outlet. I know there is a principle here but on the other hand it was a gift and you want the least hassle. Consider costing what it would be for a repair. It may only be £5-10 and fixed in minutes.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-January-2014, 13:00
druid's Avatar
druid druid is offline
Scrimper
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: England
Posts: 820
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Any goods or services that you purchase must be of merchantable quality and be fit for purpose. Any warranty or guarantee that a supplier or the manufacturer offers is in addition to your legal rights.

There is no such thing as a legal 12 month guarantee in fact goods have to be fit for purpose and the term can be as long as up to 6 years.

However you have to prove that the item has failed due to faulty manufacture or design and it is unfortunately your responsibility to prove that rather than the seller prove that you have broken the item.

As Andrew states; in law your rights are not the responsibility of the maker or wholesaler of the goods, only the person who sold them, although in practice most decent manufacturers will normally help out.

You should write to the seller and inform them of their responsibility to you and also speak to the office of fair trading. If you get no redress from the seller you can write again and advise them that you have taken advice from the OFT (even if the advice they give you is negative) and show them that you are tenacious and will not give up easily.

You have to do things bit by bit and your final action if you get no help would be to advise them that you intend to pursue them through the courts and they will be responsible for your costs. (even if you have no intention of doing so!) Only do this as a last resort as once you have made such a threat and they ignore it you have nowhere to go except court action which you really don't want to take!

As Andrew says you must be polite and keep your cool, you need to convince them that you are positive and won't go away, some companies know that lot's of people don't know their rights and use they that to their advantage and will only act when they know not doing so will cause them hassle!
__________________
John
Chief Scrimper, Woodworker, cyclist & Motorbiker
If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something
A part dropped from the workbench will roll to a degree of un-reachability proportional to its importance.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-January-2014, 20:47
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Thank you so much for your info both, much appreciated.

I am aware that my contract is with the seller rather than Thomas Sabo, which is why I contacted them. I just wasn't sure if there was a certain length of time according to the Sale of Goods Act that an item would be guaranteed for.

As TS guarantee their goods for 2 years, I think I will mention that in my next correspondence to the seller. It's also a good idea to contact TS and see what they say.

Really appreciate your help, thanks.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-January-2014, 14:11
Worldlife's Avatar
Worldlife Worldlife is offline
Safe Sane Consensual
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: West Sussex, UK
Posts: 14,843
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Sorry for the belated reply and pleased to see several very helpful answers covering much of the ground.

One problem I see is that jewellery fastenings are often delicate (for us males helping) so it would seem important to stress that the item was supplied to a 21 year old granddaughter who would have treated it with care. How many times was is worn before the fault revealed itself?

Is the threading you refer the actual link or is it the way the bracelet is actually fastened (trying to eliminate the possibility that something that needs to be screwed together had been overtightened and the thread stripped.

Are you able to see and maybe photograph the defective area to show if the thread itself has been stripped or the extent of the damage.

What I think you need to be strong about is that the product has had absolutely normal use and no undue strain put upon it. Wonder if there is a possibility that the screw and thread were joined at the factory and no locking fluid or adhesive applied to ensure a permanent joint (in fact I think that could be the potential not fit for purpose to have an unreliable screw and thread joint)

At 'em Jenonnet!!

BTW my street cred for advice is that, acting as a litigant in person, I took one of the UK leading double glazing firms to Court and won £10,000 in compensation and damages.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-January-2014, 15:40
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Well done that man!! Wish I could take on large companies like that and come out on top!

Thanks for the reply Worldlife. It's a tad more complicated than a normal bracelet catch as it isn't a screw & thread catch,
apparently the toggle fastener has come unthreaded, or unwound if you like... it shouldn't have done that, they are designed not to do that usually.

I have written back to the retailer and mentioned about the Thomas Sabo 2 year guarantee, so we'll see what they have to say when they get back to me.

Thanks again for your help.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-January-2014, 15:41
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

I tried to post a pic of the bracelet in my last post below but it didn't work!!
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-January-2014, 23:18
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Attemptitng to post a pic once again (with kind instructions from silhouette) of the bracelet, so you can see what I mean by the catch becoming unthreaded, as it isn't a traditional catch........
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-January-2014, 01:13
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Doesn't look a great design to me. The trouble is that by the time you deal with postage and packaging, it soon eats into the £21.95. Is there any chance you could get to an outlet or partner and "seek their advice"?

Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-January-2014, 13:34
Behemoth's Avatar
Behemoth Behemoth is offline
Trance Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 2,722
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Door Step Callers (including charities) are told no thanks I'm not interested and to that I or Mrs Behemoth will close the door.

If I feel that people are trying to push something on me that I don't want when buying a store then I tell them quiet politely that I don't want the tat they are trying to push on me and if they try again I walk out the store leaving the goods their. That's why I like buying online, no need to speak to a salesperson
__________________
Is the juice worth the squeeze ?
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-January-2014, 13:35
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Problem being that I bought her two charms to go on it too, so all together it added up to a pretty penny and her sister has bought her another charm for it this Christmas, not knowing that it was broken.

Thanks for all your advice peeps, will wait to see what happens when I get the reply from the retailer. Her sister said if they won't repair it she will get it done but it's just the principle of it, as it's a designer bracelet, you would expect it to be of decent quality... suppose that's too much to expect these days though.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05-January-2014, 21:43
Behemoth's Avatar
Behemoth Behemoth is offline
Trance Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 2,722
Default Re: How d o you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Do you know much about this subject please Worldlife?? I bought quite an expensive Thomas Sabo (German company) bracelet from the Internet (store on Internet, not private sale) in March 2013, for my granddaughter's 21st birthday gift. Apparently it has broken, as the catch in the middle has come un-threaded, so she can't wear it.

I contacted the store but they say because of the time passed they can't replace it and Thomas Sabo won't accept it back from them for repair.

I thought most things came with a statutory 1 year guarantee under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and should be of merchantable quality, fit for the purpose it was made. To me, breaking after 9 months isn't reasonable quality or fit for purpose, nor is it out of the 1 year guarantee.

Do you know if they can refuse to exchange or repair it?? I have been looking through the sale of goods act but it didn't really help at all. Any advice would be gratefully accepted.
Originally Posted by jenonnet View Post
Did someone ask for a consumer law expert ? Good job I'm about then

So you've bought something which 9 months later on is faulty, well you can argue under Sale Of Goods Act the item is not of a satisfactory quality (merchantable was removed in 1994) the retailer can offer either a repair, a replacement or maybe then a refund.

As you've had the item for so long (or your relative has) it's down to you to prove and demonstrate the fault to the trader. Taking it to any good high street jeweler and asking them to look over would be good enough.

Now you have to consider what the item is, and if the trader can put the fault down to misuse/abuse then you may not be covered, however it it has just developed a fault then one of the three remedies above will apply.

Trader can offer a repair, this is considered reasonable if however you are asking for a replacement or refund then the trader can ask you to make a contribution for use during the time period you've owned the goods for.

The warranty is really just a separate contract bound by its own t&c's and you'll need to check to see what these are - not everything is covered by warranty and the trader is not (and this is the one that catches everybody out) not legally obliged to offer a warranty as your statutory rights are above which take priority over that warranty.

At the end of the day the only person who can enforce your rights is a judge at county court so if claiming for less than £300 this cost is approx £25 - £35 to get the case to court.

If you've paid on your credit card then you can also hold them accountable for the same rights and seek the same resolution under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 and you can hold the credit card company jointly and severally liable for the traders breach of contract providing that you've paid £100 or more for the item

Hope this is of some help
__________________
Is the juice worth the squeeze ?
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05-January-2014, 21:53
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Thank you so much Behemoth, that is very clear and succinct. Your help is much appreciated.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-January-2014, 05:04
Worldlife's Avatar
Worldlife Worldlife is offline
Safe Sane Consensual
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: West Sussex, UK
Posts: 14,843
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Excellent reply Behemoth - I too thought the bracelet could be a problem having regard to proving that the alleged fault was associated with normal use.

For example if the case of a mobile phone was broken when dropped from head height it might be difficult to prove that this was a quality issue. OTH one would expect it to survive a short drop.

You would then research what if any standards might have been laid down:-

IST Drop Test

From this we know that our mobile phone would be expected to survive a drop from a height of up to 150 cm. In our claim we therefore state clearly that the phone was dropped from only (or should we say about) 100cm.

The detail of a witness statement might clarify this e.g the phone fell from a coffee table that was only a metre from the ground.

Now the retailer might, through the manufacturer, come up with evidence to show that the product had passed the drop standard. They therefore contend that the phone must have been dropped from a much higher point that you stated.

Oh dear did you fail to get an expert witness to do a full report that the case of the thickness and materials of your phone would not survive a fall and that the serial number of your one was of one made before those that were given the drop test.

Stating legal rights is one thing but providing claim information to substantiate that there has been a contravention of the law by the retailer needs to be done carefully. It needs to be done with the need to prove the case in Court.

When you have made your knowledgeable customer representations and these have failed a decision has to be made whether to proceed to Court or not.

Having had Court experiences (and RTI has too) even with the strongest of cases you can face a frustrating defence and lose or end up with a draw!

Although a relatively small claim the bracelet IMHO could be difficult to prove but that is not to say utmost pressure should not be put on the retailer.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 06-January-2014, 21:32
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Very grateful for all the wonderful advice folks, will have to wait until I hear back from them now & I'll let you know when I do.

In the mean time I have got another problem that has just raised it's ugly head and I am hoping you can also help with this..... We moved into our little bungalow in February this year.

Shortly afterwards I applied to have the kerb dropped outside to enable me to park outside my own property. All was done re: getting a hard standing done, etc., and in due time the City Council came and dropped the kerb.

The price for this was nearly £1,000 and as we had a lot of other expense in doing the place up, it was agreed with the Council that we would pay a deposit and the rest over 3 monthly instalments.

I duly completed their Bank Mandate form and sent it back to them and before long I saw that the Direct Debit instruction was set up on my Bank Account, the first instalment to go out in November 2013.
council offices telling me that they have applied to the Bank in November, December and January and all 3 times the Bank have refused to pay, sending a message back saying 'no account'. They said that because of this the want nearly £400 paying now with the final £90 + paid at the end of the month.

I asked why they had not informed me before now if their request to the Bank had been refused but they said it was my responsibility to check my statements. I explained that I do not have paper statements, we have had paperless Banking for years and that once the Direct Debit was set up I expected it would be paid. The Bank had not contacted me about the refused payments either.

I rang the Bank and upon checking, the lady I spoke to said that the Bank Mandate had been completed correctly with the right sort code and account number and that they had not had any requests from the Council to pay the Direct Debit that was set up on my account. She said that the only think she could think of was that someone at the Council had incorrectly in-putted the account details when requesting payment.

I have to ring the woman at the Council back tomorrow to let her know what the Bank said. I'm going to check to see if they have the correct account details but if they haven't it will be because someone took it down wrongly because the form I completed was correct. She told me they wouldn't set up another Direct Debit for me to pay monthly as it had already been refused and that I had to pay it all in one lump sum. I haven't got that kind of money spare to just pay out like that and told her so but she was adamant I had to pay it all.

Do I have any rights here if someone in the Council made the mistake of typing in the wrong account number? They've obviously done something like that because the DD is set up on my account and the Bank hasn't had any request for payment from it. What can I do??
Please can anyone help.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 06-January-2014, 22:17
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

It's generally better to do these things by letter but I do understand the worry and sense of urgency. Unfortunately, this is how Councils do tend to act. You should find in your final demand a couple of things: There will be a deadline date. If you dispute before this date, the Council are normally obliged to suspend the process. There should also be mention of an external arbitrator. Once you have had your deadlock letter from the council, the clock starts ticking again. If you choose to go to arbitration, the clock stops. This all buys you time.

With that out of the way, you may get lucky enough to have a reasonable person on the other end of the phone. It is clear where the fault lies but do you now trust the Council to only take 1/3 of the balance in three monthly installments from now on? A bit hard to do that, isn't it?

You have the Internet and you have overnight. Go to the Council website and see if you can find a payments section. Most normally have this. This allows you to pay by credit or debit card online. You are not disputing you owe them money but are having an issue with a failure on their part and with the way they are proposing to deal with it. You may wish to consider offering to pay 1/3 of the bill within 1 hour of the telephone conversation using this method and two further payments of 1/3 at monthly intervals. This is to make sure you put YOU back in control. Obvious, if this is accepted, you can cancel the Direct Debit, which you may be able to do using online banking.

Really, the only thing to fear is the direct debit that is currently with your bank. They can threaten till the cows come home and not get any money from you. Sure they can escalate, but you can also protract and delay. Whatever the outcome is, you still pay them money and the REAL object of the exercise is to spread this over 3 months starting from now. It matters not how you do it.

If they pass to a debt collector, the agent may wish to charge a fee on top. This you want to avoid and you can by paying the Council directly. You can then inform the agent that the bill has been paid and you have no clue why they are contacting you. The debt collection agency loses out and should learn a lesson about buying debts from that Council.

Take it to arbitration, you will be fine. Just be sure to very clearly and completely make your case. You may wish to voluntarily pay 1/3 per month during the process, to validate your position. The incentive for them to push diminishes.

I do with you luck with your call tomorrow. You may wish to ask the Council representative to put whatever is agreed or explain her position to you in writing.

If it were me, I would string it along as much as possible and make sure they pay the price but that is me and not what I would advise.

If they are threatening court action, say sure! Happy to see you in court. You'll still only get what is due you, only many months later, with additional fees and losses due to representation when I am offering right here and now to pay you £xxx.xx and make two more payments long before then. Do what you think it best!

Heck, the court will also likely allow you to pay in installments!

They are on a loser from the word go here. Up to you, how much you want to make them suffer along the way. Just watch that DD and try and avoid a debt collector.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-January-2014, 00:04
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Thanks andrew. It came completely out of the blue with the phone call from them tonight... should have all been paid off this month but instead now I still owe it all... talk about depressing!!

It's obviously their mistake and I really do object to being made to feel like this for someone else's mistake! Fancy ringing someone after 6pm at night and dropping a bombshell like that, knowing full well that by the time you've rang the Bank and then rang the Council back there will be no-one there, so you're left all night worrying!! They make me so angry!!!

I never thought for one minute that they would take more than a month at a time from the DD but now you've mentioned it....
Your idea of paying them by card each month is much better, thanks.

Not looking forward to the argument I know I'm going to have tomorrow but now I know it's their mistake and not mine I'm not going to take any s**t from them! Thanks again for the help.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-January-2014, 00:24
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Yeah, as soon as they realize the mistake, they are able to correct it and take what they want. You owe the money, you authorized them to take it, they are quite capable of taking the lot and wiping you out.

On the other hand, close the DD too early and you may lose your evidence.

No, I know full well how it is. If it were say a utility company that underestimated your use, the error would be spread over a year, either voluntarily by them or at first discussion with Customer Service. If you push for a Supervisor, they may extend that to 15-18 months.

Actually, I am with EDF and they messed up not taking a DD one month. I did realize, I did double check and later I got a letter saying they had noticed their mistake and would spread that over a year. Do not get me wrong, I am not raving about EDF, I am just using them as what would be considered "normal". The Councils are a whole other matter.

What I really do not know is how the bank might react. I don't think there is any way to restrict a DD. If more is claimed than you have plus your combined overdrafts, they may refuse to pay the request and then charge you for the privilege. You may want to air your concerns with the bank before you call the Council.

I must admit, I would not take a call saying it was from the Council at that time of night. Councils close from 4:30PM to 5:00PM. I would have refused to speak to them because I would have suspected a bogus call, and then phoned the office myself in the morning to check/complain.

A call is not normal. A letter is the normal route. Double check things and be sure.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 07-January-2014, 00:33
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Thanks andrew. I did phone them back after I had spoken to the Bank but got an automated recording saying the Council payments office was closed and giving the opening times but I'll go on their website and get the number from there tomorrow, just to be on the safe side.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 07-January-2014, 12:39
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Well, I've spoken to the Council woman again this morning & checked the details she has for my Bank account plus reference number for the DD & everything checks out right.

I told her that the Bank has had no requests for payment and they said that someone at the Council must have made a mistake inputting the data for the request. They have now agreed to request it again but in two monthly payments instead of three. I'm not that happy about it but there wasn't any way they could have all of it at once.

I've also spoken to the Bank and they said if I check on the day it's due to go out and I see that they have taken more than they should, I can ring them and they can reverse the payment, so I'm going to keep my eye on it. I've also requested a letter of confirmation from the Council for the agreement we've just made.... Watch this space! Thanks for the help.
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-January-2014, 15:03
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

It's a reasonable outcome. Quick conclusion too.

Most likely, the Council will do what they say and a handy tip learned from the bank.

Jen, you may not be overly happy with what happened or the outcome but at least many things can now settle in you and you will begin to feel better.

I think you have two good reasons to watch your account now. You do want to make sure that a payment is in fact taken. If not, it might be best if you make the first move rather than wait for their discovery (7 days) and reaction (around 14 days).
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-January-2014, 15:16
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Yes andrew, I thought that too. If the payment doesn't go out on the correct day I will ring and pay it by card and cancel the DD, then I'll pay the second month by card too. That way I'm back in control again 'cos I don't want them taking twice the amount the next month and I wouldn't put it past them, one department never speaks to another in that place!!
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-January-2014, 18:16
andrew's Avatar
andrew andrew is offline
Formerly exstreamuser
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 177
Default Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Ha! I have used these words many times! LOL

I do hope everything works out as you expect and do not have any more nightmares to deal with.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-January-2014, 20:20
jenonnet's Avatar
jenonnet jenonnet is offline
Foxy Lady
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,115
Smile Re: How do you Deal With the Pushy Salesman?

Ha! I have used these words many times! LOL

I do hope everything works out as you expect and do not have any more nightmares to deal with.
Originally Posted by andrew View Post

Thanks andrew. Hopefully the new year will get better from now on 'cos if this is the trend for the rest of the year I'm not liking it much!!
__________________
Handle every stressful situation like a dog..... if you can't eat it or hump it, pee on it & walk away!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
amazon, birthday, christmas, company, computer, cool, credit, deals, design, free, home, internet, law, line, lock, minutes, mobile, offer, online, opinion, police, product, reviews, shop, zoom

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Deal or No Deal iTouch fined £30k El Gringo News 3 13-August-2007 11:22
Tiscali UK signs MESH pre-install deal gem News 0 05-March-2003 21:59
Napster signs deal with music industry Louise News 2 06-June-2001 12:57


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 15:09.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©1999-2014 The Scream!