Go Back   The Scream! > COMPUTER RELATED > Networking

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 24-September-2002, 08:58
aquarius
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default broadband and networking

My daughter has a fairly new computer running Windows ME and mine is a very old computer running Windows 95. I am currently looking into broadband but don't think that my old computer has the right spec. Would networking the two together overcome this problem or is my computer simply too old? I only need the internet connection during the day to check e-mails and occasional surfing but generally we wouldn't be online at the same time, although I know it is possible. Running physical cables would be impractical and have heard something about Bluetooth. Can anyone advise please?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 24-September-2002, 10:01
Memfis Memfis is offline
Former TS! Team
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: ex TS! Team Mansion squatter
Posts: 3,894
Default

Bluetooth is unsuitable at the moment for that kind of data transfer, besides I'm not sure there are actually any products that will help.

If you wanted not to do cabling, I would purchase a adsl router with built in wireless access point, I believe ASUS do one off the top of my head, try the bargain basement @ http://solwise.co.uk don't know if they still have any.

Then purchase 2 internal wireless cards for the PC's.

Off the top of my head I'd say as long as each PC is withing 20 meters of the access point it should not be a problem.

unfort, the cheapest option would be to use cabling.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 24-September-2002, 10:07
Onslo's Avatar
Onslo Onslo is offline
Screamager
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Newbury, UK
Posts: 4,261
Default

As Mem says.....wireless router is the best option to avoid cabling.

Bluetooth is similar, but is more of a standard for wireless compatibilty across a huge range of products, from phones to PDA's rather than a home networking solution. Not really what you are after.

'Slo
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 24-September-2002, 10:22
aquarius
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default broadband networking

Thank you both so much for your advice. The computers are in rooms next to each other so distance shouldn't be a problem. At the moment I am looking at different broadband suppliers. I know that BT Openworld do one where they engineer fits it all for you. Expensive but it would save on hassle. Perhaps for an extra charge they would sort it all out for me. But I am relieved to hear that it is possible because, as old as my computer is, it works perfectly for what I need and doesn't really need to be changed.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 24-September-2002, 10:30
MarcusT
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wireless Network

I've got 3 pcs on a wireless network, the main one running XP with an ADSL connection (green frog), the secondary one running ME and the third one an old laptop running 95. Shared internet connection works fine. I run it as an ad-hoc (peer to peer) network arrangement - that way you just need a wireless network card in each machine and don't need the expense of a separate router. Best to buy the same brand and tell the shop what you want them for - that way, if you can't get them working you have a right to take them back.

I find that, whatever they claim, more than 2 rooms away in a solidly built house gives an unreliable wireless connection for shifting large files between machines - but often OK for small amounts of data or browsing / e-mail. Next room or 10 metres always works great as the network speed is way above ADSL speed.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 24-September-2002, 10:35
Memfis Memfis is offline
Former TS! Team
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: ex TS! Team Mansion squatter
Posts: 3,894
Default

Seriously, Go for wires only.

u don't need an enginner to come & they won't set up your router anyway, you will still have to do that.

In fact I can't even think what an engineer actually needs to do inside anyones house anymore.

P.s. don't forget the splitter if the router you by doesn't have one in.

P.P.s that router in bargain basement I believe is also a wireless access point, but you had better check.

I use the ASUS 6000EV (without wireless) so if the BI one in the basement is a wireless access point as well get it as mine cost 150 withoput wireless.

I'll also be able to give you a hand setting it up, but belive me when I say ASUS aren't too bad, as long as you follow the instructions. They may be a bit long winded, but well worth following.

-Mem
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 24-September-2002, 11:04
aquarius
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default broadband networking

Let me get this straight, I just need network cards for each machine, same make. I don't need a router (or do I). If I have a BT engineer over anyway setting the broadband up, surely simple enough for him to install the network card and configure it. I use my computer for business so I have to be 110% sure that everything works easily. I would be using my Windows 95 just to check e-mails and some typing but no downloading off the net. The computer that I would be networked to (Windows ME) is the high spec computer. Please could you spell this out in idiot-speak? Many thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 24-September-2002, 11:25
MarcusT
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default BT Engineer

When I had ADSL installed by the BT engineer (this was before there was a "wires only" option) all he did was replace the white box to which you connected a telephone with a white box to which you can connect a telephone and a cable from whatever feeds the ADSL to your computer - in my case an Alcatel "green frog" that connects to the computer by USB. He then demonstrated that on his laptop the ADSL connection was working. He did not even install the "green frog" - that was up to me, although it was simple enough from the instructions sent by the service provider (not BT). So I think you have no chance of him installing a network card for you.

Assuming you have USB in your ME computer, you can use a USB wireless network card - so you don't have to open up the case, but do have to configure the software (again, easy enough from the instructions).

However, if your 95 computer doesn't have USB you will have to install a PCI card inside the case (not as daunting as it sounds if you take it step by step).

I don't have anything except the "green frog" to get ADSL from the telephone line and a network card attached to each machine - and I run a perfectly working network with internet connection sharing (which comes with ME and can be applied to 95), although of course the second and third computers can only access the internet if the computer connected to the ADSL is up and running.

A router is not necessary in a simple set-up, but it does have some advantages. Perhaps someone who advocates using a router could spell these out.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 24-September-2002, 11:34
aquarius
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default broadband networking

Marcus and all,
Thank you for your help. I think I understand it now or much more than I did this morning.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 24-September-2002, 11:41
Behemoth's Avatar
Behemoth Behemoth is offline
Trance Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 2,722
Default

I think that the router is the easiest way toget more than 1 computer on ADSL. My router has a built in ADSL moden so half the battle is sorted.

Get 2 network card they don't need to be identical, becase with my 3 comps at hime I run a Intel card, a Realtek Card and a Compaq card!!

You'll need tcp/ip installed, but that normally installs itself when you install the network card drivers. Plug router into phone line, makesure you can get into router admin page, this is done in IE and it's just like typing in a web url mine is http://10.0.0.2. Your TCP/IP config should be set to get IP address automnatically, because your router will assing your LAN card an IP. Then plug in your comps to the router using standard network cable (RJ 45) and once you've setup the router with all your details away you go

It far easier this way than having to mess with ICS (Internet COnnection Sharing) Which is cheap and cheerful, and plain nasty as I've never been able to get it to work.

Behemoth
__________________
Is the juice worth the squeeze ?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 24-September-2002, 12:20
MarcusT
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Router or ICS

Basically, you can choose either a hardware solution (router) or a software solution (Internet connection sharing).

See here:

http://www.homenethelp.com/802.11b/wifi-shopping.asp

The second diagram is how I am set up except that the ADSL modem is not connected to the main computer by ethernet cable to a NIC (network interface card) but simply to a USB port, which means that the main computer does not need a second card.

Whichever solution you choose, you are almost bound to need some help configuring something (it is a bit of a learning curve). The site above is useful and you can always come back here for help.

If your main computer running ME is capable of upgrading to XP, I would recommend you consider it - it is so much easier to do these things with XP and it's a much better operating system in many other ways.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
adsl, bad, broadband, bt, cable, cards, computer, connection, files, home, intel, internet, laptop, line, mail, make, network, new computer, online, pda, phone, port, realtek, router, sharing, shop, shopping, software, speed, web, windows, wireless

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 15:35.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 1999-2014 The Scream!